9 Date Ideas That’ll Make You Forget You’re a Grown-Up

I love me a good “dinner and a movie” date night, but they’re not unique or memorable. The nights I do remember are when we do something we both initially resist, or are scared to do (I’m looking at you ocean kayaking–at night.) I also remember the nights when everything goes completely sideways, but because we’re together, we have an unexpected blast. Here are some date night ideas that are sure to kindle (or rekindle) your sense of adventure, childlike wonder, and appreciation for that guy or gal in your life–no matter how adult you are.

1. Play Truth or Dare

Grab a bottle of wine and prepare to get honest. I would recommend saving yourself some hassle and maybe abstaining from “truths” about exes or the how your partner thinks your butt looks. But you do you!

Read more on Redbook!

Settling Into Your Favorite Spot in Nature: Relaxation Recording

vNE8214NS9GOvXOy7DCu_DSC_0266Happy Holiday weekend y’all!

Because a few extra days off can easily slip into drowning yourself in making up laundry washing, email responding, baseboard washing (just me?) and many other uber fun activities, it may be a good idea to allow yourself to chill for a few moments. If you need some extra support, here is a recording to help you settle into your favorite spot in nature (even if you’re unable to physically go there.)

*Just type 0 into the price box to get it for free.

Sending you love!

xo

Bailey

 

This Is What A Mom’s Voice Does to A Child’s Brain

My son was born into a room of chaos. But the moment I spoke, my voice cut through the noise, flowed into his tiny ears, and he immediately turned his head toward mine. We locked eyes and an epic love affair was born. (He hasn’t been able to get me to shut up since.)

I thought my experience was just some mama-baby magic, but it’s actually based in science.

According to a study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a child’s brain has stronger responses when exposed to their mother’s voice versus the voice of a stranger — even if the mother is speaking nonsensical words for even a fraction of a second! Magic. Science magic.

Your child’s anatomy isn’t the only element affected by your voice — their emotions are also soothed, like when you’re explaining why Diego left Dora for his own show or why marshmallows and peanut butter are not suitable breakfast foods.

Read more on Babble!

Talk to Me: How Talking to Our Grandparents Can Make Us Better People

562588_326545470733970_1514296375_n

G-Betty lookin’ fierce on her 86th birthday.

My relationship with my Grandmother Betty (Grambetty) has always been a selfish one. I share endlessly about my worries, accomplishments and major missteps, siphon rich streams of advice from her, send her photos of my little family but rarely ask for images from her life and generally fill her with my own “stuff”, scarcely asking about her experiences.

 

She recently visited my home, and arrived on the same day I heard about the Huff Post Talk to Me project- total “Ah-ha! I’m a jerk” moment.

 

“Why haven’t I done this with my Grandmother before?”

Read (and watch!) more on Huff Post